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Is Naltrexone a Controlled Substance?

Is Naltrexone a Controlled Substance?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved naltrexone. Its primary use is for the treatment of alcohol and opioid use disorder. Naltrexone prevents alcohol and drug abuse by lowering drug cravings. This is how it aids those in recovery in maintaining...

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A Complete Guide: The Sinclair Method Debunked

A Complete Guide: The Sinclair Method Debunked

Around 14.5 million people grapple with alcohol use disorder (AUD) in the United States. Individuals with AUD are unable to stop or reduce their drinking on their own. Their alcohol dependency impairs their ability to fulfill their responsibilities, damaging their...

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Insight from a former drinker

Insight from a former drinker

We all get started from uniquely different backgrounds, experiences, and traumas. Coping mechanisms and defenses develop from an early age to protect us and allow for our survival. Oftentimes, these can mutate into something that haunts us as we grow up, and...

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Alcohol causes more ER visits than you think

Alcohol causes more ER visits than you think

"Having worked in the emergency department for over 30 years I certainly agree with Dr. Green’s comments [regarding alcohol related problems seen in the ER]. I would also go as far to say that more than 50% of the problems we see in the emergency department are...

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Wellness

Wellness

"Wellness is a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity." – The World Health Organization. The key phrase in the World Health Organization's definition of wellness is "well-being, and not just the...

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How will people react when you stop drinking?

How will people react when you stop drinking?

One of the most important things you can and should do when tackling a drinking issue is to realize that nobody is judging you. Better stated, you shouldn't care if anyone is judging you, even if they might do so. Most people go about their daily lives concerned they...

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Secondary causes of alcohol use disorder

Secondary causes of alcohol use disorder

Think of a "cause" as a factor. It can be anything from a genetic predisposition, to a neurochemical reaction, to environmental factors. Many factors may combine with another to cause a condition such as alcohol use disorder. It's impossible to attribute alcohol use...

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What are Neurons?

What are Neurons?

Specific neurons, and their relationship to one another, play a pivotal role in alcohol use disorder. Neurons are separate cells that reside close to each other in the brain but do not touch. Instead, there's a small space in between each neuron called the synapse....

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What is Target Dosing?

What is Target Dosing?

Targeted dosing of medication is also called "as-needed" dosing and contrasts with "constant dosing." An example of constant dosing is to take a pill once a day, or sometimes several times a day, but consistently on a daily cycle. The idea with constant dosing is to...

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